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The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
17 Mar 2016 - The Sendai Framework: Making the difference for poverty, health and resilience.
What is it?
The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 with its seven targets and four priorities for action, was adopted at the Third UN World    ...Read More
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The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
The Sendai Framework: Making the difference for poverty, health and resilience.
What is it?

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 with its seven targets and four priorities for action, was adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction on March 18, 2015. It was endorsed by the UN General Assembly on June 3, 2015.
The Sendai Framework is a 15-year, voluntary, non-binding agreement which recognizes that the State has the primary role to reduce disaster risk but that responsibilities are to be shared with other stakeholders including local government and the private sector. It aims for the following outcome:
The substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets of persons, businesses, communities and countries.
THE SEVEN TARGETS
The targets focus on substantial reductions in (1) disaster mortality, (2) number of affected people, (3) direct economic losses and (4) reducing damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services. The Sendai Framework also seeks a substantial increase in (5) national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020, (6) enhanced cooperation to developing countries, and (7) a substantial increase in multi-hazard early warning systems, disaster risk information and assessments.
THE FOUR PRIORITIES FOR ACTION
Priority 1. Understanding disaster risk:
Disaster risk management needs to be based on an understanding of disaster risk in all its dimensions of vulnerability, capacity, exposure of persons and assets, hazard characteristics and the environment. Such knowledge can be used for risk assessment, prevention, mitigation, preparedness and response.
Priority 2. Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk:
Disaster risk governance at the national, regional and global levels is very important for prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, recovery, and rehabilitation. It fosters collaboration and partnership.
Priority 3. Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience:
Public and private investment in disaster risk prevention and reduction through structural and non-structural measures are essential to enhance the economic, social, health and cultural resilience of persons, communities, countries and their assets, as well as the environment.
Priority 4. Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction:
The growth of disaster risk means there is a need to strengthen disaster preparedness for response, take action in anticipation of events, and ensure capacities are in place for effective response and recovery at all levels. The recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction phase is a critical opportunity to build back better, including through integrating disaster risk reduction into development measures.

TO LEARN MORE VISIT www.unisdr.org
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